Mike “Cold Front” Kurre’s Tips for a better outdoor photo shot 29 Nov 12

 

  • Buy the best camera you can afford….it does make a difference.
  • Make sure the camera has plenty of memory. No memory means you have nowhere to store the images.
  • Make sure the camera’s batteries are charged and have extra batteries on-hand.
  • Read the instructions that came with the camera to at least get a basic understanding of the camera settings and features (I know you probably won’t do it, but it just wouldn’t be right for me to leave this one out).
  • Shoot lots of photos at various angles and distances. You can always delete them.
  • Avoid camera movement by steadying your body during exposure by leaning against a railing, tree, or other structure.
  • Zoom in on your subject. More subject and less landscape is better.
  • Place your subject to the left or to the right of center. Asymmetrical photos are generally more appealing than symmetrical ones. This will also help you capture the landscape in your photo while allowing you to zoom in on the subject.
  • Pay attention to where the sun is or is not. Putting the sun behind your subject creates glare behind the subject and makes for an awful shot. Likewise, putting your subject in the shadows when there is sunlight all around will make your subject hard to see.
  • If you have the option, take your photos in the early morning or early evening. Dusk and dawn make for nice light and interesting shadows.
  • Lose the hat. The shadow it creates hides the subject’s eyes.
  • Don’t just take kill or trophy shots. Action photos of aiming, cleaning your firearm setting the hook, casting and etc.
  • If you do take photos of the trophy….clean up the blood.
  • A little arm extension is OK on your fishing pictures, but don’t overdo it.
  • Take some photos from as low a position as possible and shoot upwards….this gives the sky as a background and looks awesome in most photos.
  • Set up a system in your computer and label your photos for future reference.